Home>Latest Shows>>DePaul Treatment Centers 092417

DePaul Treatment Centers 092417

Sep 21, 2017|

AN INTERVIEW WITH ERIN DEVET, DIRECTOR OF RESIDENTIAL SERVICES AT DEPAUL REGARDING THE WORK THEY DO WITH PEOPLE WHO HAVE DRUG AND ALCOHOL ADDICTIONS AND ABOUT NATIONAL RECOVERY MONTH.

Related Audio:

  1. Kaiser Permanente Mental Health 101517

    Audio

    Wed, 11 Oct 2017

    Download

    AN INTERVIEW WITH DR. HAN LIANG, CHIEF OF MENTAL HEALTH AT KAISER PERMANENTE ABOUT THE EFFECTS OF DEPRESSION AND TEEN MENTAL HEALTH.

    kaiser permanente found at 0:15, 9:04, 10:58

    On the show this time I would like to welcome doctor Han Lee Yang chief of mental health and the child and adolescent psychiatrist. At Kaiser Permanente thank you for the welcome glad to be on the show. So tell me about what you do first looked at Kaiser Permanente to me about your job. Yeah so I am a child and adolescent psychiatrist. And I staff a program called eighteen I
    a better spot. We're talking today with a doctor Hahn being from Kaiser Permanente . Don't doctor Gupta to talk about the state of the American health care system as it relates to mental health and what can we do to improve it. Yeah. So I. Again I'm really impressed by the fact that he. Here in
    seen over the time. I'm so I have been practicing here with Kaiser Permanente for the last. Seven years. And I think. Even in the last ten years there's been exciting developments. And seeing more and
  2. Marathon Scholars 101517

    Audio

    Wed, 11 Oct 2017

    Download

    AN INTERVIEW WITH STEVE WASSERBERGER AND BROOKE ADAMS WITH MARATHON SCHOLARS ABOUT THE WORK THEY DO WITH UNDER-RESOURCED CHILDREN TO MAKE THEIR WAY THROUGH COLLEGE.

    gospel music found at 22:53

    hum there's the Portland interfaith gospel choir. And that speaks for itself gospel music and can teco singers. The two rather pick pick like Dick range of genres from classic to pop to jazz. And we
  3. Boys & Girls Clubs 092417

    Audio

    Thu, 21 Sep 2017

    Download

    AN INTERVIEW WITH IMANI MUHAMMAD, SENIOR DIRECTOR OF PROGRAMS AT THE BOYS & GIRLS CLUBS OF PORTLAND METRO ABOUT THE WORK THEY DO WITH YOUNG PEOPLE IN OUR COMMUNITY AND THE OPENING OF THEIR NEW ROCKWOOD CLUB.

    portland timbers found at 23:27

    other and be in that club at 230. I didn't even mention Portland Timbers . I've donated. The football court that we have a football port rather crop. From a parking lot as well in the bad
  4. American Foundation For Suicide Prevention 091717

    Audio

    Wed, 13 Sep 2017

    Download

    AN INTERVIEW WITH RYAN PRICE WITH AMERICAN FOUNDATION FOR SUICIDE PREVENTION ABOUT THE WORK THEY DO AND THEIR FUNDRAISING WALKS COMING IN OCTOBER.

    american foundation for suicide prevention found at 0:23, 2:58, 24:30

    to welcome Ryan price Ryan is the Oregon area director for the American Foundation for Suicide Prevention in there and how has it gone thanks for having me sir thanks for coming in. So did Tony and to me about the American Foundation for Suicide Prevention will be used to yes aware different than some other suicide prevention organizations you know we're not crisis censor anything like that
    stability to save the most lives the fastest. The script. So the American Foundation for Suicide Prevention has a pretty bold goal yeah we do can you tell them yeah sure it's called project Tony 25. And this is
    even talking to David Brian Price the orient area director of the American Foundation for Suicide Prevention . Let's get Mitchell's bill is an Entercom radio Portland public affairs program I'm Gary blocks of if you're involved with a nonprofit
+

Automatically Generated Transcript (may not be 100% accurate)

This is metro scope and Entercom radio Portland public affairs program. I'm Gary blocks them this time on the show we're going to be talking about addiction from the very effective help that is out there and available with the default treatment centers. On the program this time I would like to welcome Erin do that Darren is the director of residential services at DePaul treatment center stay there and. Hang hang it there ransom don't wells malware. Tell me about DePaul treatment centers. Good park to treatment concerns that the nonprofit organization and that we're one of organs oldest and largest providers. And residential and outpatient substance abuse treatment. Her adopt and use our mission is to create freedom from addiction for individuals. Families and the community at large. And you have three different locations in our areas are correct. We have relocation Hillsborough downtown Portland in northeast part time. Our Hillsborough location is for outpatient in DUI program. We did serve a dark stare as well as. Used from thirteen and then younger adults to 25. That age range means it's you know a specific focus. And then we have our downtown Portland area which it. Detox medical detox withdrawals from my alcohol. Will be used heroin and and in residential treatment. He treatment outpatient services and DUI programs. Our downtown location is by far our largest location. And then in northeast Portland we have they used. Center for residential. Substance use disorders and we served minors under eighteen years. So this month for Delaware kind of winding up some timber September has been national recovery month can you tell us about what's been happening this month. Yeah recovery month is that a national observance held to educate. Americans just I think she's treatment and mental health services can enable those with mental and or substance use disorder. Still live a healthy and rewarding lion recovery month celebrate big gains made by those in recovery. Justice we celebrate you health improvements. Made by those term managing. Other health conditions such as diabetes hypertension asthma and heart disease. He had servants just reinforces the positive message that behavioral health is essential to overall health. Prevention works treatment is effective and people can and do recover. Do and addiction and to mental health issues kind of go hand in hand. Oftentimes absolutely. Many people are in use substances to help Medicaid. And other you know underlying. Disease or. Disorder. But not but they don't always move like that somebody can abuse drugs and alcohol without a mental disorder. Correct apple Lleyton. So what is the difference between substance and alcohol addiction and substance abuse. So it has been. And alcohol addiction and is a chronic. Did he is. With that often includes three laps seeing and deeply the other thing is is that an addict is very compulsive and that they cannot control. The need to use drugs aware that things that they do to be able to use strength they did on a daily basis often. And if they don't happen there alcohol or their substance they need to go through withdrawal the need medical attention. Aaron. People it says people who suffer from addiction and they continue to use despite any harmful consequences. Substance abuse says that eighty not a it's again this thing if we are knowing what we're watching for. So that it doesn't turn into an addiction issue. Substance abuse is usually you're used to seeing maybe you only on the weekend and used. Noticed that now in order to use things that he used to enjoy it over. You may want to have some drugs or alcohol to be able to enjoy it either before during or after. Maybe you're starting to notice that your having problems within your family eat because of your substance or alcohol use. It is. These games that start to happen that are good indicators that you have an abuse. Problem and you may want to intervene now the court his prediction. Once they get to addiction it is much harder to treat without actual treatment. So it but how difficult is it to get somebody in treatment come and what do they experience. When they come into treatment yet. Or how late what is it like for them to make that decision to come into treatment. It's very tough it's a tough decision to make. And I understand that it's usually based around a lot of fear like here. Admitting that. That you are powerless can you can't stop without hope. Senior. What is it going to be like without your drug or alcohol once you start having withdrawals. And it's a tough decision and that people struggle with from the daily basis and working in the killed her over nine years now. And being in recovery myself I eighth seed this struggle and I know that you think this small window of time. That. Want somebody says I want again how open I wanted to rate now they we need to take that opportunity. And therefore we want treatment to be super accessible and easy to get into it. And it is a tough decision and so it's very courageous for people that are able to admit. That they have a problem in May need help and Apollo is so wonderful plays it safe. We have staff here that doesn't count aren't recovering each and those that have experience with alcohol and drug. Used in their own Stanley systems in these people are here because they wanna help others find that freedom. Because some people on staff that have some first first base knowledge. Yes well written. So tell me what it's like when somebody does decide to. Make that first step in come into two polar or give you a call what is that experience like for them. Well. I think we get varying reviews on that. I think over all day experience is wind that the concern and and welcome mean we try to be very positive and give them multiple options. We want it to be and a client decision. You know often times will we may recommend residential and maybe they're not ready to do that. And does good news is is that we have outpatient here as well. Or maybe they needed detox and they have a place to go home to so they can come and they can withdraw from there. I'm drugs and then that gained the support that they need from the peer mentor. To be able to come back and go to outpatient groups or trying to recovering in their community. DePaul really you to go holistic approach. We have peer mentors which means says there are people in recovery that we employees specifically. To help. Our clients. Find recovery themselves outside of our treatment center though our pyramid turtle cake. That clients out into the community and literally blocked them. Through the process so that they're not alone and sit there that they are overwhelmed by fear and then they don't do the things that they need to. To stay clean and sober. Could you talk about some of the programs that are offered at DePaul so there's there's several programs available correct. Yeah absolutely have. Well like what I said we have the detox program did you explain so let's let detox is. Naturally it's. It's a medically monitored it. Process. With we use medications we have 24/7. Nursing. And folks they're giving medications cute a relieve them of this symptoms of withdrawal as much as possible so that they can get through that. Physical. Simple. Withdraw and get to the places where they don't have any of the drug in their system. And then they're headed clear and they consider. A new life. Now must be of a difficult. Process to go through. How politically. That is that's the scary part that's the fear attacked about earlier there. You know it's tough to make that decision because you know it you're coming in here to detox that you are coming in here to be sick. And that purse that's very Gary. In the middle residential what is more what does that program. And that program we have to eighty bed you're 84 and it's we have a mint residential unit and a women's residential units. The program is about ninety days sometimes it just depends on what the well liked. Support staff person already have them play is often times our clients come in and they don't have anywhere to live. The age don't have a job haven't worked for a long time and so and her residential program they will start to back build a condition of recovery. Learn these skills and then we will help them plan. Where they're gonna go look for work has helped the rhetoric than me. Helped them get their ged it's got what they need to do we also. I'm help find them housing that is clean and sober. So that's and that's a pretty in depth process that's that's a lot of work you're doing with people. Yesterday as well where at worst supporting them they're the ones that are gain work. And I know we are just two. Sort of like the change agent. If somebody does come in and they don't have a job and they don't have. In a means to pay for this process how is that handled. Usually when they come in and they don't have a means to pay for the the process we would help them. Gain on insurance and we do have some funding to moment account meaning can halt. Help our clients to have nothing to be able to find that freedom. The other and others three other programs Dietrich an adult how patient and DUI I could you explain those forests. So. Often times can you drop down from residential because that's when he course having care. Which means that they live here and there are. We have a three shift of staff says there's always a staff member here and able to help them. Once they leave residential often they going to do treatment. Which is just. It's more hours and you meet your peer counselor twice a week of verses. Once a week or once every other week and a patient it's a little bit more intensive you have more hours of groups continued treatment and we feed GO. And then it went Keiko can continue trimming your dish usually drop into like intensive outpatient. Services. Which is just to step down you're not meeting with your counselors. It's here I mean you know your group. Maybe last groups. And just slowly through the process we. You know take away more and give them more. And still learning and looking for we give them more freedom. To make their own situations. Because we've helped them build that foundation. To be able to do about it and make good choices to. Have pro social. Activities in your life. We're talking today with a parent that director of residential services at DePaul treatment centers. They're and one thing we've been hearing in the news quite a bit is the hope we going to epidemic that seems to be rampant across the United States overdoses and and Justin did a gigantic open to a problem. Who what's going on without. Yeah. If you really really answer this. Yeah how great effectively under our answer we hope sleeping on a fixed it is an epidemic and it's huge and it's everywhere and it's impacting. Handle me being young young kids in high schooler getting addicted to a bit. And the United States since 2000 the rate of deaths from drug overdoses has increased a 137%. Including a 200%. Increase generate an overdose deaths involving the Peoria it's pain relievers and Harrell and last year February overdose killed three people each week in the Portland tri county area. And sad thing is only one in ten individuals in this area are receiving the necessary treatment they need to overcome their addiction. That stands. It is astounding that concerning. It is a community issue it's gonna take all of us. To help. Solved that problem and make sure that the other nine people that need. Help are able to get to help. The new pew we often think about Caroline is that the street drug and it's pretty dangerous but open Lloyd painkillers. Are kind of the same thing are very similar thing. There are very similar and and the thing is is that because their first trip by doctors and people. Have them in there. I think handicap home. We don't really. Paying enough attention to that. In the if you have young kids home when you've got to look you created pills in your medicine cabinet. The likelihood is they take it and then try them with their friends and then. It just starts that cycle thinking it starts with all of that being aware the that didn't score and keeping those medications out of the reach. Our children. And taking it seriously looking at the painkillers that were prescribed. Just as dangerous as street that's heroin. Is there anything being done with regard to doctors over prescribing. Hope during painkillers. Yes. There are things to being done to. Help alleviate. I know Kaiser. Permanente. Doctors are. Very conscious. How many pills they prescribe at a time with their prescribing him and that they've added extra layers that go along with. Being elevate it and prescribe and so preloaded. Madison. I know and I've had to put just a personal story and had a couple of surgeries and were who has described. Painkillers and acted in it seemed like a huge amount to merely why delay why I have this many and I used for a couple of days and and then got rhythm appropriately and in. That doesn't happen all the time though. Oh no absolutely not and there are. They're worth a lot of money on this street. The reason that people end up going to heroin is because the painkiller. Narcotics that are prescribed are. Substantially more expensive. What do you in this may be a question you can't necessarily answer but why is there an open Ewing and addiction epidemic right now. You know that is the tough question. And I think there's multiple reasons that even the number one is that. The United States in general over prescribes the period. And we need to look at using something different that did not become physically. Addicting. And and then that we have. Drugs coming in here you know from other area as. Then argent infiltrating all of our cities and dot I can't answer but I don't know how of that happening. At the rate that is it's concerning. So real low and addiction not only impacts the person that has the addiction but the people around them as well. Can you talk to us about X. What kind of impact that somebody with an addiction has on their the people around them. You I mean they can be. They can be a huge impact since her I mean even if they're not there it says take. Believe and then the mom is staying in tatters stand up on my worrying about. Where their kids and we increase our call. Now and it's gonna be horrible tragic news. So there's still worrying. There's the an effort stat a lot of feelings I see they put and take getting their kids in treatment. And then they kids will you know. Blow out of treatment. And I think we need to understand and today community that relapse is often a part of their recovery process. And so not giving up on our loved ones and continue means she is pushed them to make different choices but at the same time we have to take care of ourselves. And not and let them could be boundaries and not pay conduct ownership of somebody's addiction. And I can got a lot of lives especially in our youth program with some of the parents. They feel like what have I done wrong. And the thing about addiction is. It is that disease and you you didn't do anything wrong to cause about disease. The disease is there and so now it's not what have you done wrong it's what can you do to help your candidates or you're. CME member. Find a different way to cope with sir emotions feelings and situations that happen in life. What are some misconceptions. About addiction. Conceptions about addiction. I would pay that mostly that it's not people don't view it as a disease. And and oftentimes people. If you notice somebody's in recovery. You may not trust them and letting people. Look at people who have addiction issues. Amoral feel lenient and a wave to this speech since society. They're definitely has taken my you can't trust people who have an addiction they're gonna steal and rob been. Totally horrible things. Addiction and I think it definitely is. When I was going through my own recovery process one of the things that I noticed is that. My Caylee didn't understand. That. I needed to go the twelve step meetings I needed to go to treatment I needed to do all of these things. For the rest of my life one day at a time. Or I wasn't gonna get well and I think that's a misconception we feel a lot why can't they just stopped. Once they stop everything should be content. You know they seem like they sleep seems like you're that a lot like what you need to stop. Right what was that experience like for you can you surely believe your story with a. Yeah so. Term need a lot of times it may mean relapse you know it's a relapse is definitely a part of my recovery process because I feel like they're worth something wrong with me. I should be able to control that I should be able to get better obviously conduct the way I was raised straight eat. The move on you've. Pay your boot star on the walk right through it has the problem is and then the reality was and I didn't. I didn't understand that until home I didn't get clean in time understand that patients say. I am powerless. Over my addiction and if I used or I drink. Then I am opening that door back up and what I do after the fact. I'm usually powerless over because it. Once I open that door than I am doing those things over and over again that seems Hannity and the disease of addiction and don't per mile to really. Is really a powerful moment when I realized that I actually. Can't control it I have to. Surrender to it. And trying to emulate a list. And they understand that I have to do things every day to keep myself. Scene and moving forward and clean and so burn. With that in mind why is it's so important for people with substance abuse addiction to get treatment from organizations like DePaul. Because they think you know we help people if you don't have any pain or your whole family. The relationships are in turmoil because of irrigation that you need a place where you can go these days. Gain since skills gained some clean time. And that the role player who is that you're gonna deal with these situations within your family lives but in your community. So that when you leave it treatment that you are able to be strong and maintain recovery. They need to save claimed that con. And getaway for. That they really hustle and bustle of our world that has. Kept them using. And apology able to do that and where. We're able to help them find. You know the foundation and recovery network that they need so when millions upon the pollen no longer here. They have a solution outside of care. How important is it to have people that have gone through Britain recovery process in DePaul. Helping people that are currently doing through the recovery process. Boutique therapeutic value of one addict helping another's without parallel. You know. Dylan Bob alcoholics anonymous and therefore they. Created alcoholics anonymous and there was no solution for people to drink or use drugs they were worthless and they were homeless and it. They were crazy or they were all these things that they actually weren't and when Billy Bob created the alcoholics anonymous program that is really about. One attic helping another one alcoholic helping another. Is without parallel. To somebody can relate to you and what you're going through. You have a little bit a hole. And it has often times you think you're alone in your addiction. And you don't really. So the last bit we have here and tell us tell somebody the can get a hold of DePaul. You can get a hold of that online at DePaul tremendous sinners stop or at its. Or you can contact our access sinner inside 035351. Line that's five line. And if you don't have access to either of those things and you can come in and we are. Thirteen twelve south with Washington downtown Portland. And then. From there we could direct cheated the appropriate aircraft. Pro the most important thing is there is help out there and and he can work. Absolutely can work I am living proof. That the policy mission work. Also there in this has been super and informative thank you. Think hero and appreciate that have been talking today with Erin knew that director residential services have to cultured and senators. Mitchell's go he's an Entercom radio Portland public affairs program I'm Gary blocks of if you're involved with the nonprofit or public affairs organization or do you have an idea for an upcoming show I'd like to hear from you. Visit microscope PDX dot com and submit your ideas you can also go to the station's website Hanson richer information there. Thanks for listening to metros go and enjoy the rest of your weekend.