Home>Latest Shows>>Cascade AIDS Project fundraiser

Cascade AIDS Project fundraiser

Feb 8, 2009|

William Kendall and Michael Kaplan with the Cascade AIDS project talk about the showing of the movie, "Valley Girl", to benefit the Cascade AIDS Project. They also talk about the state of AIDS and HIV today.

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Automatically Generated Transcript (may not be 100% accurate)

You're listening to -- -- -- a series of interviews -- people of interest in northwest Oregon and southwest Washington. I'm your host Joe and wins -- a fund raiser is being held for the cascade aids project. And the news today is event organizer William Kendall and cascade aids project executive director Michael Kaplan test to tell us all about it. I think you both for joining us today on metro stop and Chris Paul Michael what is the mission topic cascade aids project. That's -- aids project works with medicine and prevent. Educate Caron advocates. And and that ranges for prevention it means war working with think communities. Stopping new infections each year an -- 70300. New infections nationwide 56000. New infections. And we do prevention through things like Arab man twellman sent out stark street. Our outreach to let -- Latino communities who have migrant camps. Tom we do education through things like a statewide aids test TD hotline which gets over 4500. Calls per year. I'm care through programs like housing case management early intervention getting people -- medical services. And then advocacy at state and federal levels in terms of legislation and funding. Well tell us a little bit more about some of these programs that you have what you do to execute that mission to get going to a little further Sarah I'm out talk about a couple of those so one stand with the -- -- on the Senate. I'm an Oregon unlike the rest of the country the national norm is 50% of all HIV cases are among gay and bisexual man. In Oregon 75% of cases are among gay and bisexual meant. So we are we try to have a focused effort among the game bisexual community through the -- well on the Senate. We do everything from educational programs there built in community we do HIV NS TI testing there. Tom an offer referrals through that program. Another program. That's more about -- sport there's a couple one would be -- starlight which takes kids every summer for a week out to the coast. Kids who either were affected -- infected whose parents are living with HIV. And help them deal with some of the pressure in the struggle so what's it mean to have your father and living with HIV and getting social support. Some of our social workers will work with families in the schools in terms of bringing that dialogue into the schools. Some of our education programs may be having positive speakers going into the schools. Or just training other social services and how to deal with the top the ground HIV and it's. It's interesting that you talked a lot about a man you said men are 75%. Affected by HIV and aids but there are still a number of women who are also affected -- tells little bit about that. Absolutely effect the fastest growing infections would be among women empire particularly the off someone men. With -- communities of color African American Latino specific. Comments so there's a host of programs right now. We you know the best. Support group I would talk about is actually run by another agency and it's called women of wisdom in effect I'm gonna go have dinner with that group tonight to talk about what we're doing. But there's things like -- -- housing services we provide housing support for over 500 individuals a lot of that is women and families who are taking care -- kids. And keeps them in stable housing so they can get them medical needs met. Are your efforts paying off are we seeing a change are we seeing a different is the difference is that making an impact. MEI and I've only been an organ for four months back and tell you certainly across the globe we're seeing a difference whether work keeping up with the reality of the epidemic has a hard one to say I mean. For the last eight years across the US we've seen no progress and reeling in new infections. In the late ninety's our federal government stopped increasing federal funding and in the late ninety's we stop seeing progress and declining infections. On -- that's sad we do have progress in getting people treated getting more people to know their HIV status but there's a long way to go. Once statistic would be while there's one point one million people in the US living with HIV. About 300000. Of them. Don't even know of their own HIV status and over 40% of all new infections can be directly linked to the 25% who don't know their status. So how -- we find out what our status says. Is the get tested you can request testing no it's gonna test you for HIV without your knowledge but you can ask your doctor to do HIV testing. Or you can go and whether through one of the county clinics. Again for gay and bisexual men we offer testing two nights a week and -- on the Senate but there's a host of places to get tested. What we need is people to get motivated to know the status. And a lot of people don't get tested because they're afraid that it's going to affect their health insurance and an affect them down the road whether they're positive or not on is that the case. The concept anti tested positive and a 1992. On back then there was no way I was gonna have my doctor -- is I was terrified of what it meant for my health insurance. Com today it's really hard to get discriminated on based on your HIV status HIV is protected under the Americans with disabilities act. -- and so. The reality is knowing your status makes a huge difference I've lived sixteen years with HIV. And by knowing about my HIV status I'm able to take good care and I'm able to live much longer. Well take Magic Johnson for instance he's been around for a long time so obviously that does make a difference exactly exactly and it's unfortunate actually an Oregon. 39% of all people who test in the state. Well -- they have aids at the time of testing or within twelve months from the time they tested which means we're just getting it way too late. And they could live much longer much better if they only had earlier case identification. You say that you tested positive for HIV back in 1992 what are the chances of your HIV turning an aids. I mean the chances are eventually that would get I for many years I didn't actually need treatment I currently am on treatment. And HIV impacts everybody's health definitely I am privileged to have access to good health care private insurance. -- doctors who take care mean in support of family. But it has been sixteen years and as of now it's continued as HIV and hasn't gone on to be eight. Ellison in a metro scope and we're speaking with William Kendall and Michael Kaplan with a cascade aids project talking about an upcoming fund raiser for the organization. As well as how things are going with aids and HIV. These days so -- people have aids or HIV here in the northwest and are we seeing those numbers changing. I'm black and speak it's hard because we crossed the state lines we have Washington and Oregon but if you looked at the metropolitan area. There'd be about 4000 cases of HIV people living with HIV in the metro area. In Oregon there -- it's a approximately 7000 individuals. Estimated to be living with HIV 4900. Known cases. Nationwide. As I said one point one million. What were making progress and -- treatment so less are dying so each year in Oregon we have 300 new infections that happened. And 100 deaths which means each year. There are 200 more people being added to the community of people living with HIV so it's a growing community of people. Who are infected and affected by HIV. Let's just talk a little bit about medical break -- what kind of medical breakthroughs are we seeing with aids and HIV and are we seeing things on the horizon are we getting close to a cure. Well I'm I'm with treatment side there's been great progress there's new drugs coming on line all the time in many that are very effective. You not started probably in the early nineties with things like AZT there's many more options today. So we're making progress and making it a illness that treatment can certainly mitigate the impacts. From a -- were actually further back today than I think most people thought we weren't decade ago and in fact -- I'm a vaccine front in 2000 -- the only human trial that was going on for vaccines. Was pulled off. And lead director Fran and I it's -- that the department that does vaccines actually -- we need to rethink our whole approach on vaccines. And and so a decade ago people were very hopeful that maybe 1520 years south there was there was hope for the vaccine. No one sees it in the near future at this point. And is that because of federal funding. Well the federal funding this certainly federal funding going into it does more federal funding going into vaccines than previously. There have been huge ramp up resources in terms of combating the epidemic. Globally Tom as the as most people know there's a huge. Focus on Africa. 22 million of the 33 million cases of HIV worldwide can all be found on the continent of Africa. I would say I mean if I talk about failure funding from my perspective the biggest -- -- has been in prevents and in fact if you looked at what the federal government invests and HIV prevention. Two day and compared to 2002. There has been a 20%. And it's interesting because now or in a really down economy and so how is that going to affect your efforts. Well I mean we all saw on that on the news front if folks are watching CNN in the last few days and -- locals they sensed there was the whole debate about the stimulus package. The community of nonprofits working on aids. But they saw a ray of hope when that was 400 million sat in the stimulus package by the Senate for combating HIV HIV NS TI prevention. If for some reason I guess a job loss and public health isn't as important as -- job last an auto industry -- housing. And the Republican Party unfortunately said. This isn't about public how offices and about HIV they pointed to that as. Gross negligence in terms of this was port. The reality is even a cascade aids project just in December we eliminated four -- four positions because of the way the economy is hitting us. We need the stimulus as much as any other sector but -- politics is playing hard with us right now. You're listening -- -- -- or speaking with. In Kendall and Michael Kaplan with a cascade aids project were talking about an upcoming fund -- for this organization. And also the status of -- is an HIV to this stay. Let's talk about the status of aids and HIV right now it is and getting kind of pushed to the back burner remember. You know back in the eighties when they first yeah. Came up with the -- diagnose the disease and then there was a big push to try to find a cure and ninth. -- and we still hearing a lot of auditors are getting kind of pushed to the back burner. I think has been a little burn out. Over the last decade certainly I think a lot of attention swayed. There was a lot that turned to Africa what's going on there and certainly Africa needed the attention. I'm unite used to work internationally travel every couple months over and Africa and visit countries like Botswana. Where one out of every four people are living with HIV in countries are literally falling apart. Com I think to the attention in the US has waned from and it's unfortunate because the -- as I said earlier the number of people living with HIV. Is growing and effective in the CDC who for years thought we weren't about 40000 new infections each year. In late 2008 -- we were doing it wrong we have. Better technology and we actually estimate that there are 56000. New infections happening each year in the US due to a completely preventable disease. So what do you say to people young kids. People in the gay community community women African Americans Latinos what do you say to these people. To prevent them from getting this disease. Well and I think there are a couple messages and a couple of audiences for those who are infected I say get tested make sure you're not affected and understand that. And then have a conversation and be ready to talk about safer sex whether you decide -- if you decide to be sexually active. If you can't have a conversation with someone about that it's probably not good person you can have sex with anyways. So it's to be able to go to those conversations. I think it's important for parents to be able to top with their kids. I think and Oregon were blessed with some very progressive legislation for sexual education and HIV education in the schools. -- but we need to keep that dialogue going it can't be just say December 1 world aids state discussion but it's an ongoing discussion about aids. -- as I said get tested know your status but with that needs to be the message that. Being HIV positive isn't the end of the world certainly I would far rather not be HIV positive ban. But you can live well if you know your status and take care of yourself. People are living with HIV need to be able to find support to be open about their status and to have people still welcome them into their homes. And into relationships. That's gotta be a tough thing for somebody who is HIV positive or aids positive to. Be able to be comfortable enough to talk about. Your issues with sex with the with the potential partner. How do you do that what do you do I think about that. It's it's a really tough thing and part of what we're trying to do and hopefully it cascade aids project. As make it easier for HIV positive people to be out in general because it then makes the conversations in the bedroom and other places easier as well. -- but basically get support so one 81 example an activity that's -- about sex but is about. Helping raise awareness is in May were organizing for project 150. For -- 150 anniversary. A 150 HIV positive people doing a volunteer project in the community. The has nothing to do with HIV but simply raising awareness that people are out there. So what else can people do for your organization. Well I there's a whole host you know certainly we always require finding a -- this -- and October we did that aids walk -- for the first. In time in five years. The and income coming in was down in fact it was down by 50000 and part of what required us to then do some layoffs. I'm so certainly financial support is huge but we recognized not everyone can do that and there's many other things people can do. The first one I would ask of everyone is what I said earlier start having conversations. Start talking about HIV talking to people intend to do they know how to protect themselves. Do they know where to get condoms -- -- sexually active. Do they know where to get -- if they don't go onto our website at WWW. Cascade aids dot org. They can link right on to the statewide aids STD hotlines and get links to all the testing sites throughout the state. By Connie. And a bunch of other resource to -- I encourage people to do the conversations. And then also to be open so that people are able to be out about their own HIV status. You're listening to -- -- and we're speaking with William Kendall Michael Kaplan with a cascade aids project about the status of aids and HIV these days and also an upcoming fund raiser. For this organization. And William -- you guys do have this fund -- coming up he could tell us a little bit about the fund raiser what it's called what you hope to achieve. Actually well the Clinton's chief Peter was kind that's done the space -- for the fourteenth. So we're gonna go in there and we are gonna screen the eighty's classic valley girl. Never brand new sound system in there and all proceeds that we -- in donations from people attending the event are gonna go directly to cast today it's. And now are there going to be any other events taking place during mass screening like live auction and are anything like that you know. I think that movie speaks through its pro. And and they got a Renaissance is like a setting Clinton's seat theaters so. You know we when they're last year for. My wife tonight is anniversary and it was just such a blast it's 35 millimeter in his just its glorious to watch and they've. You know got a group of -- is a lot of fun things to do in. They were just looking have a good time raise awareness about this program. So how much are tickets and had a people go about getting tickets for this event well here's here's and -- the great thing about it tickets are anywhere if we're asking for donations from anywhere from five to ten dollars or whatever you can contribute. We really wanna support this program and we want people to talk about this event. And really help us raise awareness about it so. Anywhere from five to ten dollar donation and to show a night of it starts at 935. And you'll start playing so yeah. And once again the location is it's the Clinton street theatre read on the corner of Clinton and 22. And how many people can haven't how many people does that theatre -- We are looking to fill it with about 220 people but the response has -- great you know people are really supportive of this program. And people love valley girl the girl. And that's a first she hasn't done this to this sort of a fund raiser for the casket is project absolutely. But you know we might them for speaking for myself my wife we've just huge fans this program we we we think we're more people need to find ways to volunteered. If they're doing a movie shows like business. Finding ways to get their friends in -- or do concerts are. Have a dinner your house and asked people that you know -- twenty bucks whatever you can need to support this program hasn't economic times like this. You know we really is -- program like this -- community. So does this kind of a grassroots effort on your -- and your wife's part them. Absolutely had said what I call my constant effort to keep that would my wife. That. As it is Valentine's Day. So what a great day to celebrate. Maybe with a loved wine and tried to. I guess. Minimized the effects of aids and HIV at the same time which is kind of -- a loving disease -- can say. It you know. I think this is a great opportunity to not only show they care about people you community. But I defy you to find more romantic movie message it really is you know. The classic self. Yeah some -- after raising any ideas. Well I do raise anywhere between 2000 to 2000 dollars don't like essential in this is really about awareness people getting involved finding new and creative ways to do fund raisers for local programs like casket is project. And just really thinking outside the box we're in -- -- you know we're in difficult times right now and we have to get creative. And this is. The perfect example of just taking it one night event to sort of you know restructure and make it -- -- raise awareness and a few dollars to cast and it's. You're listening to -- -- Skype and we're speaking with William Kendall and Michael Kaplan with a cascade aids project we're talking about an upcoming fund raiser for this organization as well as the status of aids and HIV these days. Now I've got to say will ABC seem pretty passionate about this organization. How did you and your wife get involved. We first got involved. Working with the aids related programs in San Francisco. When our son was born our goal was to really help him understand how important it is to be involved in community activities and and we did the aids walk. Every single year with him we made -- a focus for him to really you know. In from a child to get that sort of perspective of that and -- it just it really we know we we we just felt really committed to that program and it's something that you know our family is committed to and this community we just feel that we wanna. In note reading going out and and stuffing ourselves and doing very selfish things on the state you know what better way to talk about eleven and to have. The whole day be about love than actually do something selfless and and for the community. What about corporate sponsors he's looking for corporate sponsors or volunteers for this event. You know I I I would recommend that you know that if we were gonna get volunteers for people to contact cascades. Cascades dot org and and try and find ways. To volunteer with communion and see what the needs of the program as. This event should be pretty easy to put together and we just you know that's that's kind of the example we want -- that would this is that. You know this is basically a couple phone calls and we have a fund raiser. You know we we we called the Clinton street theater that they signed now we called cap they said thank you so much and that's it you know so. I think really what we wanna say is don't help us volunteer come have a good time think about cascade -- and -- you can involved in the program. And and just enjoy yourself and then go out and doing yourself. Oh what a great idea -- to come up with the viewing of a movie to help raise money what are some other ideas that you have for fundraisers for the cascade is projects and things that people can. Take upon themselves as kind of a grassroots effort. You know like it's every fourth easiest one to throw a dinner party invite your friends over. Makes impostor it's like a buck a bag it's you know it's a family type event. And that's people -- just donate twenty bucks a pop and then talk about the program talk about ways in the community can involved -- that have. People over for coffee. Go to your local restaurants -- -- I'm sort of sponsorship -- Go to your local ice cream store and ask them to do sponsorship nights. There's million ways you can talk concert if you know someone plays an instrument -- to do performance. Just there's so many ways to get involved and it's I think. By contacting the cascades project you know is it isn't great way to get these things started and talk them about ways that they can help. Well it's interesting Michael are you getting a lot of people there of you know trying to -- these grassroots efforts to try to help the organization these days or is this something has been kind of ongoing. And this has been a big part trust would come third party events what someone outside of cascade aids project pulls it out to -- -- us. No work on your part we're gonna do and benefits it. For some people they're not -- to pull it together and I do -- -- cap has two other major events a year what we try to make it easy for people to raise money for cap. One of those is the aids walk and the next one coming up will be October 12 2009 pioneer square. We usually get about 101000 people turn out. And individuals pulled together their own teams -- onto our website and everyone can raise anything from ten bucks to 101000 and it's amazing event. The other one which I'm really excited for our is our annual our evening and oxen that event accounts for 15% of our budget over a half million dollars. It will take place on April 18 of this year this year is our twentieth annual art -- so we're excited about this. And there's a great opportunity for corporate sponsorship in terms of the twenty year up. Evening the Knox and com those are two major -- always if you want to do something easy come to our website go online buy tickets organized walkers are set up -- table. Then a lot of other people do such as well as doing with the event organized and and I would -- with the and enjoy a event organizing as somebody wanted to pursue that and one is somebody to speak about the cascade aids project. You could probably round somebody up pretty easily absolutely in fact on our website under I'd donate to cascade aids there's a part that talks about third party events. And what we can do to help support people if they want to organize from providing materials to speakers. So quickly Michael if you can give us any information on how people can get in touch with you folks. The best way always is go to our website at WWW. Cascade aids CA FC ADD AI DS dot org. And there you'll find a phone number you'll find emails for staff in the various departments and reach through that. And I would imagine -- you'll find a lot of information about your organization as well. -- yeah absolutely you'll find information about other programs but what you also find a -- to -- earlier. As though linked to the statewide aids STD hotline which has just been updated. With stay online module that has up for five days a week certain hours has online chat so you can get information right away. If you don't want to call are a bunch of resource is just by clicking us. Right and that email address one more time required. WWW. Cascade aids CA SE AD EA IDS dot org. All right we want to thank you both for joining us today on metro scope William and Michael. That is William Kendall and Michael Kaplan with a cascade aids project. And we've been talking about the state of aids and HIV. And about an upcoming fundraisers it's going to be held on Valentine's Day. For the organization. And that's metro scope and. There's programs yeah I'm your host -- and winter if you have a public affairs or non -- event that you'd like to let others know about. You can email me and communications and the information. You've been listening to members of.