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Homeless Youth

Oct 25, 2013|

A discussion with Dennis Morrow, from Janus Youth Programs, as well as Susan Stratton & Darcy Vincent, from NBS Multifamily Management, about the state of affordable housing and the homeless youth issue in the Portland/Vancouver area. www.janusyouth.org www.multifamily.com

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Automatically Generated Transcript (may not be 100% accurate)

-- you listening to -- -- of a series of interviews with people of interest in northwest Oregon and southwest Washington. I'm your host -- Douglas we deal with a lot of different charitable organizations and topics on this program the one who seems to come up over and over is the issue of homelessness. The issue of housing as our housing market tumbled. About to a four years ago now you know things have gotten worse and worse and worse and I -- very curious to find out if things are getting any better. How we're doing here in the Portland area and and especially with a focus on and and how kids are doing homeless youth so I have with me today three guests I have in the studio mr. Dennis -- from the -- youth program closer. -- there and I have a Susan Stratton and Darcy Vincent from NBS multifamily management how -- excellent well let's get things kicked off to let her listeners know a little bit about ourselves and how you came to be with your respective organizations. Dennis -- -- well I'm executive director -- -- programs I actually went to Janice in 1980 and gave them a three to five year commitment because I totally get bored really resent the fact that the yes I thought well I'll snap back I'm still there either says I'm unemployable in the open market or have never been -- just that everybody who -- you go. But it's isn't. I am currently with north they -- -- and I joined that company can start a multifamily management company as the north's statement and an affiliate. And I got over twenty years in the apartment management this event and I didn't previously ran at Kirkland apartment about 6000 units to kind of western days and I met again and he'll win benefit organizations and I think -- -- and one of the building that I managed. And delay I -- my relationship for the organization that I have brought with me mining company. Excellent excellent RC. I'm known isn't I'll hook and property management multifamily property management throughout honey your English and have known her because -- Portland is not being large panel and to spend about fifteen of those twenty years specializing in -- -- -- -- property management. It's a multifamily residential apartments. Octavia account. So glad we'll bring Sarah you're talking about the Jenna -- program and you'll get into how both organizations work together here coming up. Dennis also a little bit about the Jenna -- program what exactly is it well Janice is one of the whole larger. Service agencies in the state focused on -- teenagers OK a lot of people haven't heard about us because most of the kids that we serve her kids that either people. Don't know about or don't wanna know about. Because we work with people who use a really have -- virtually no other option by the time they get to us so we have a whole range of programs reaction have over fighting 45 different programs at twenty different locations and we operate in the Portland area and also in Vancouver. In the southwest Washington. Are sort of lines of service is one of them is that we are a residential provider of service predominately for boys mostly of homer in the U Virginia's authority. So we -- long term care to try and help them heal from wounds that have happened to them as a child and helps them up perpetrate further violence -- further crime on the community in transition safely and to the world we also are the largest provider of services for -- runaway and -- Houston area that you mentioned earlier in the introduction and so we will shelter over 2000 runaway -- home issues between Vancouver Portland this year we will make over 30000 contacts with -- used to street outreach programs we have in most areas and we have a significant program that we had just begun developing working was girls who were victims of sex trafficking while we have the largest in -- program in the state of Oregon workers or 400 girls last year under is seventeen all of whom had infant -- -- when we work with -- and interestingly enough -- registered organic farm. -- that is interest in so we had a battle field live -- have to garden programs in north Portland and public housing projects through the residents can grow their own organic food and often that we spun off fish farm which is -- two and -- takers on Soviet island no harm is run by teenagers from north Portland every summer they just closed down about two weeks ago when they made about 30000 dollars this -- Growing and selling -- more vegetables and farmers' markets new seasons is -- the contracts are negotiated so it's an alternative to. Other things that they could be involved -- journalist. I think it's I think Greg there mean it does seem out of left field a little bit but. I think you can speaks to the creativity of your transition that tell you take this thing that was. Don't for one purpose and like oh hey look at this now they've got they've got a job to do their -- to make -- money for the program eccentric. -- and they graduate from school we've got to use who when you to a selected as the -- so millennium scholar there's only -- -- also a thousand of those nationally until 2000 arrogance and when he started our program he was -- a new immigrant to this country and barely spoke English so we we have some real miracles have happened across all premature. Then you said you had been -- assesses the early eighties that the silhouette that -- suggest you start allies has been around Jenna started in 72 Jose Multnomah County program and so there was actually one of the first seven drug treatment programs in the entire country and it's hard for people to imagine that being a radical concept now there's 72 -- was radical. -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- yellow brick road and really go out make contacts with the use him both swing we -- we are working -- -- -- side of the river and over clerk -- in Vancouver. And then their job is to try and make a connection with the kids and talk to them half of the street to -- a tremendous service. Robinson first level servicer will typically accesses our emergency shelter which is what Susan referenced earlier this building were still in the shelters find. We have thirty minutes of emergency shelter every night in Portland and then in the same building we have thirty -- of longer term shelter for the -- can live up to three or four months while they're trying to do -- usually for a -- to get him to treatment -- -- enough workers -- school slot and one of the partner agencies that we work -- I say but in terms of your earlier question about what's what we've -- with -- since the recession threat in the past year we open our emergency shelter and a 45 every night -- the first -- -- off the -- to -- Played 55 every night were full. While there -- turning. Even during the summer we were turning ten to fifteen to tonight Barack before the recession started in the Summers we would run fifty to 75% capacity and if you think Kevin I -- emergency shelters like an emergency room you never won before yours wanna have room for the -- of -- permanent. And for a year now we've been turning kids away. Wow that's that's crazy so. He said you who work with various partners once the kids get through your long term program. -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- In Portland is really an amazing town for for charities I speak to so many of them here on this program and so many nonprofits and -- terrible organizations worked together there's this kind of overreaching web that kind of covers the city. It's seems pretty special I mean everybody here's you know of this event or that events involved with with when charity or another but when you start talking sisters you find they all talked to each other and that's how they're able to all do a better job. It's it's pretty amazing. Yeah I mean I would I would absolutely assure you that in the homeless -- area for instance we are in national model and we had a federal conference here last year last fall where they had over 700 people from around the country including a top federal bureaucrats a row and homeless and runaway youth programs. And we toured the system downtown and I said to them to do you see anything like this anywhere else in the country -- have no. OK so my observation that it seems specialist -- it's up to -- a restaurant that's that's fantastic. In that network. What role does it Janet's play. -- -- -- kind of a greater scheme everybody kind of takes apart what they do in the program is it just kind of debt -- initial outreach to get kids up off the street and transition them into these programs where the -- -- an emergency service we do other stuff but our primary focus and the -- again the way the systems are knitted together Multnomah County there -- three different systems -- service one for runaway kids -- reviews usually under seventeen -- have a family and go back to. One for homeless juice which is usually seventeen to 24 year old. Girls and boys that don't have a place to go home to and then the victims of sex trafficking so this three different systems of service were part of all of those. But Janice is unique role as we are the front door into all three of those systems so we have 24 hour availability of intake anytime of the day or night. And what that means is if we end up with -- coming in the wrong door inadvertently -- the police bring somebody in don't know what door they belong and then we're like the emergency room we screamed we assess if you need emergency shelter we can provide to emergency shelter in a variety of places and then if you help getting back -- we can do that but if you need help getting home and near downtown and shouldn't be -- Houston -- -- to the other system classic so we're -- like -- one -- -- talk about a -- emergency room and others were like an air traffic controller -- -- -- -- -- -- because well again we will. We will touch over 30000 Hughes at one point or other just during the course of one year. That's amazing we just joining us elicited a -- to scope a series of interviews with people of interest in northwest Oregon and southwest Washington I'm your host Ted Douglass my guests today. Are a Dennis morrow from the Janice youth program. And as Susan -- then Darcy Vincent from the NBS multifamily management company that well I guess -- what you guys he explains -- what you do Susan you wanna give -- -- Sure India police and the management provides property management services to apartment owners in Oregon and Washington stay. And and I mentioned before that in the business for more than twenty years and I recently joined our -- concern companies to start. The -- management company that was -- feeling pretty conservative industry. The north paid attention to -- the end. So we. You know -- managers we're taking care of the current after an adult with physical facility we hired -- -- directed after and who we're marketing. You present director of the men taking care of -- renters want to become president and monarch community. What is the state of affordable housing in the Portland area. I'm going to help -- -- -- an expression -- commitment and good background in Carlin would apparently have been head and you've -- -- talk a little bit about people who are at risk of homelessness today. I think -- industry definition of a affordable housing is that. Any -- wish. -- The terms of your take home salary is how many utilities included. -- did a lot of people in this city of Portland that are red. Burdens that are really not give an affordable housing situation for themselves and yeah. In terms. How he admitted development focus toward low income people -- about 41. Thousand units of affordable housing currently. In the market in the poorer county district multnomah Washington Clement Clarke and do you work in helping community services that's about fifteen or 20000 less. Units that are needed to help people affordably. Her community. The deficit. Well that seems to be mean just Canada natural symptom of of the recession. Me you know impede people's. Wages are are stagnating and then the cost of living is going up and up and up so. Suddenly what used to be a third shifts take home pay is now -- take on John if you look at Oklahoma choose one of the trends we've seen is the increased number of views on the street and and many of them yes the story when we come in many of them are the oldest child so -- eighteen years old when my family it's a recession and they lost a job. And basically somebody had to go and so -- the first one against Jefferson solicited to raise leader and what we're dealing with so how are we doing and they in the pro market. In in the car market created speaking about conventional apartment. The market on if you're an actor is -- -- because along with the recession and a lot of people blocking their home. Into foreclosure or what have you -- to create a large demand for apartment apartment community across the country. And you prior view cute a lot of new product was delivered to this apartment market for many years. They have created multiply that he'll look at increased demand. The vacancy in Portland is about 3% which is really small and didn't you know wait for almost two years. And -- if -- -- person looking for a place to live you know times are tough because different volatility increases. Maybe it was -- -- -- increased demand and a short supply. The cost of that -- has gone up quite a bit to the average -- in the Portland area is now about 800 dollars a month for a one bedroom one bathroom apartment. You're talking about it on the urban core. The average one bedroom one bathroom at her restaurant closed at 14100 dollar -- could change -- -- -- Wow that is that's crazy I'm you know I'm funny and had actually you know. It it's affected me my family and I we did move out of the Indian -- Portland area we moved up to the verbs because we can no longer afford to be -- down close to downtown where we wanted to be. So we do live -- -- -- we'll about the city outskirts of -- and now and we haven't had decent size house and all that but it costs a pretty penny and it's it's not always easy it is to get five. And again that there and me in the into the homicide then if we have homeless Jews who can get a job a lot of times -- in entry level jobs. And an impasse before the recession there was sort of an assembly line that moved him from the streets to a shelter shelter to a program program to a job job to an apartment and out. -- we stop doing it -- jobs for the whole assembly line backed out and that's on our shoulder started filling up. And then what Susan's talking about in terms of the rat race even if they have jobs now many times we can't afford to get department used to be able to get so it's creating. The backlog in terms of homelessness on the street because of the shortage of soccer in the prices. -- Here that Washington. Plus a little help. So I know that you guys are proponents of apartment owners having apartment managers. Why is that one of the benefits. And I think apartment management even unlike other types of real estate management. Is very very -- can't fit it people intensive and requires a constant attention to a lot of -- Yes but they can't hurt some people that wanna be investors. Actually operating their investment may not be the monkey. -- meaningfully into their time pulled from an economic standpoint. And perhaps even to debate on their own actor -- their background and and what they would like to be doing. I think government managers look at what they bring to the table for an owner is kind of stability that it really translate into economic success and that -- In when you think about. All of the did he -- around being employer people. And helping people like 24 hour day seven days -- -- drinking -- here -- that come up with a lot of need for hands on attention. End. If you're not prepared -- to be dealing with it. The issues that come up that -- fairly confidently and also the emergency situations. It and it could be good option for some -- department. I'll we'll we'll have expertise in the areas they're prepared to -- and done bringing lots of the cable and promoting and marketing standpoint. So -- rent ending again gaining the most out of here that's meant by understanding how you fit into the marketplace. And it's also important. It's a little bit of an investment your investments -- And it did feel like looking to become more complex than we're kind of beloved become more complex than they do change. So I think they're fun weekend. We can be lowered into -- voucher for you know even the smallest gap can be conflict. So getting back to where we are today in the housing market here with such huge demand is such a low supply. Why is it that more apartment buildings are being built. And that conventional credit standpoint we're apartment building have not been built because the -- In our recent history. The market -- in their community have not been kinda Q providing reasonable return to an investor. So they don't -- new product has not been constructed until very recently. Just ask some of the rents pushed up and it doesn't become the more attractive than investment for an actor. You look you have great now we are looking for new development now of the ground for the first time -- got into any kind of go. We have not expel an apartment that are either under development are planning and a -- area right now. And I sound like a lot when you consider it historically. Does Portland metropolitan area had built. About 4500 apartments per year on average. 6000 unit over a couple of your period of time it's not it's not a huge amount and we over. Down to where we -- adding about a thousand apartment here for -- during that recessionary time those. I think that you know we are adding to penetrate got fiddled picked and timetable to catch up with the demand. In terms of developing affordable housing the resource does that make. I'm good guess. Along that kind of helping the little -- can be lower. People eat a lot of vehicles. Like tax credit either low income housing tax credit -- -- affordable housing tax credit. This is the limit applies -- the federal sources and the profit to get them a very competitive. So even knowing that that we need fifteen or 20000 more units of affordable housing. Not that many units are going to be funded that quickly. Rent rent now says nothing gets fixed overnight and so very very slow process. So while that's still an issue we do you have folks like to -- -- program helping to at least put a put the finger in the Bakken and try and stem the tide of these kids at least in trouble. You see guys we we'd talked about earlier in the interview Janice deals with. But away homeless youth teen moms used in the juvenile system victims of sex trafficking even. Can he tells few successes you've out. This all sounds so dour but there has recent successes. Along the way wells would -- in the business I kind I think but the interesting thing for me as a bench essence 1980 -- they -- have never had a day on the job when I went home -- I don't wanna go back tomorrow because our work -- I had some days a legend will have to face what was there but there's something about just knowing if nothing else we got 62 is off the street tonight that's a starting point. And give you one of our sort of our all star success stories -- -- young woman who was fourteen years old moves here her family -- from New York she became homeless was addicted to heroin that fourteen on the streets of Portland. And this year she will be finishing her first year of internship residency -- a doctor. At the university of a San Francisco wow oh is it -- to Portland State on -- generous support a scholarship -- -- board provided. Went to -- HU on scholarship money this year in tennis never enjoy hitting him -- to be a doctor. Specifically to work Bruce family medicine and probably go back into some Third World countries to countries are trying to help out people like herself while that's spectacular that spectacular we have a -- mom who ended up after everything machine went through her child's not only okay but she's becoming a nurse. That you know we look at those team those babies the entrance of teen mothers and without support and help third extraordinarily high risk for Foster care system for homelessness for an adjudication. With help and they grow up to be healthy kids so. Sometimes just the big things that happen and sometimes just the accumulation of little things but she -- think. You gotta believe that if you get to kids with the right kind of energy and are kind of program at the right time. Then there's always hope friend so I imagine you guys say this sounds like a big operation you've got going you've got -- need help he need volunteers we use volunteers and some of her program areas our biggest volunteer -- -- actually was so street -- restraints where we told right now we train people and they go up from 6 o'clock to 10 o'clock every night. And we have volunteers -- range from Reed College students that are doing. From the college placement kinds of things are loyal to retired people under fifty to 65 years old to have decided this is only wanna spend some time to turn your back to the community. We also have a lot of volunteer groups that will do things for our programs. We have churches -- PTAs -- agrees it will cook meals for the shelter so every hit every one might amongst the shelter meals are provided by a group. We have other groups who do simple things like a -- driver or any Laura had to drive -- hundred people are really for probably go through about 6000 pairs of socks -- in winter because that's one of those big items on streets of Portland has -- Else is linked to websites and websites out there every day for sleep I'm so we give them. Dry socks that's a way to establish a relationship build some trust and hopefully eventually gonna -- off the street so we have a multiplicity of -- We also have a board and Susan to -- that -- I wanna say something about the after the board just before I was looking for good folks to join us senator Susan. And we would love them and good local business owners that are competent professional areas could get involved with Canada as well. With some of the things that I -- really compelling about the organization and the reason I want to continue to encourage them. Well that one of the things people don't realize that Internet Janet had a real diversity of programming and they're very niche program. They won it when they were in existence we get cute aren't they cracked. And I know -- -- -- -- shelter programs or some of their crisis intervention program you have kids. Probably end up and you know facilities are -- we're really does not -- me they ought to be Indians were allegedly wanted to see them taking their that it wouldn't be an alternative. In the other I think in his thinking about Hanna could and is the high level of skill and education packet is that's required by the down people that they attract. And they're -- highly paid many current and he -- the need to look really skilled workers. And they're very because if you can get -- -- and educating you -- keeping these kids an educational environment are really high. So they're credited at this school from many kids. -- it would serve particularly concerned disadvantages. That would otherwise find it near impossible or impossible to stay in school and actually graduating from high school. And that's the kind of some of those can't programs really realize needing that lucky personally. I'm the mom and upload the local business owners because I know our communities are much stronger for the program. Like Canada. Brad -- located just a quick example we -- -- -- of our workers from our shelter of two emergency shelters in Vancouver and once you cross a river who we are the only emergency shelters for kids until you get to Tacoma wow so we had -- so worker that went into a fast food -- district -- some lunch in the -- behind the counter any tension waved at him go. I know you. Stimulus -- what this girl had been in one of our two shelters in nine different times during her. And she looked at a guy and she says I wouldn't be alive today. If it wasn't for you and -- while the and so sometimes just a big things and sometimes us a little things and that's what it's a strong. I can't think of a better note to go out on do you wanna mention of course -- youth programs here we've been talking to you that Dennis morrow from -- youth programs as well as Susan Stratton and Darcy Jensen from NBS multifamily management I wanna I wanna mention that in addition to volunteers of course years can always use some cash. Yes so please go to is is Janice do you stop organ Genesis -- JA NUS. Use dot org and that -- can donate there just. So please please this wonderful organization really helping out our community as assuming you've organizations that come on this program do. -- and they can use your help. I'm -- to get some timing got some cash putter out there bring out your teenagers are there you got good -- and you know -- you spring among them yet gently used as just -- just -- fifth death. Absolutely well think you also much for coming on the show today thank you very much. All right that'll do it for this edition of matches to open Entercom communications public affairs program I think your hopes -- Douglas. If you have a nonprofit -- public affairs organization that you would like to let others know about. Please email me at microscope @entercom.com. And -- concerts -- -- And get snagged by my spam filter. Or angle directly to the station's website click on the community link and submit your information there. Also if you'd like to hear this program again you can visit our podcast page it met your scope PDX dot com where you'll find this and the last couple months worth of episodes. And please feel free to post it to your FaceBook -- MySpace or blogger Google+ just what are what every -- was trying get this information out to as many people as possible. Post thank you all so much for joining me thank you all so much for listening this is thin mattress.