Home>Latest Shows>>Sauvie Island Center 7.13.14

Sauvie Island Center 7.13.14

Jul 8, 2014|

An interview with Anna Goldrich, Executive Director, and Shawna Hartung, Education Manager, with the Sauvie Island Center, a non-profit organization educating youth about food, farming, and the land.

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Automatically Generated Transcript (may not be 100% accurate)

You're listening to -- got a series of interviews the people of interest in northwest Oregon and southwest Washington. My name's Gary -- some ending 2005 the Sylvia islands and was created to educate youth about food farming in the land. Today on microscope we have two women who are very involved with the Soviet island center. What little welcome and a -- -- could hinge on a hard time to microscope or -- -- -- -- used to be your parents. So you read this that the Soviet island center and well the that is that -- are so weird so these are pretty -- said. Well everybody says little difference. And I can think of it and similar to Latin you see it with confidence and it's believable and and so. I recently read the story of so these islands. And Omar -- Spencer former president of the organ historical society. Has learned in his research that the islanders preferred. Yes at the end so peace and too many people I've ran into used yes. So I say so be sometimes I see so these of their time -- pending depending on the people on the box itself. What a beautiful place regardless of -- In the Soviet island center to me what is the surveillance and here. Yeah so and the mission of the so -- -- senator is to give Portland area children. An opportunity to explore and experience a working farm. And so we offer. School field trips in the spring and the fall to bring elementary school children out to spend their whole day with us. Exploring the farm and experiencing armed science based curriculum. And then we also offer opportunities in the summer summer camps for kids to come out and spend five days in a -- out -- so the island twitches. Not a pretty great place to be in the summer there certainly is yeah. And so we were founded in 2005 by a -- greater she's the owner of the so we haven't organics arm. He she is to get lots of calls from teacher is too. Want -- to bring their kids out says take a look at organic farm and and so she always enjoyed doing an -- a nice break from farming. And eventually she felt play key instead of just walking kids around the farm for about an hour. It would be really neat if they could spend their whole day out are really not getting their hands in the dirt -- and doing some planting anti staying hands so. She teamed up with -- Shriver Hillis the chef at wildwood restaurant at the time. And the two of them came together to form this nonprofit organization the Soviet on center. So good that kids to still learn that type of stuff and do -- We'll things very different today than they Wear when I was growing up here in Horry and I always had lots of opportunities to get outs on -- picking berries or lot of people had backyard garden and and so I'm cooking and food were a lot different than they are today and so. Parents are working more or not everybody has space or the time to -- -- home and the food that we get in the store. Is different than what we might see growing out on a farm and so. It's very it's a very different experience today for kids about half the kids that come out to our programs and number -- a farm before. So it's a really unique experience for them to spend a day out they're seeing the kinds of things that grow around here. Getting a chance to pick and -- those. Well so how do they know how kids react to. More recently in the closing circle after being -- fight our trip one student. Through his -- hands up in the air and he shouted. I love organic vegetable. That was his contribution to the circle he was just so happy to have the opportunity to spend a day just harvesting and eating fresh vegetables off the farm and he was just very elated and it was a great. Great thing to witness. And part of the reason we're doing masses that so is that kids don't have these experiences normally through there. Life and some more and more studies are showing that. You know we have growing health problems in this country and -- start with children. And so. Over the past few years they've been doing more studies that now when children are engaged in gardening. It makes him much more likely to taste and enjoy fresh vegetables and that's really important part of a healthy. Diet and so the more children that we can expose to. Gardens or farms or. Have any kind you know through school gardens -- experiences like cars just a healthier or make our community over the coming years. It's pretty lucky for us to be able to live in this type -- -- we're farming is still. Still happening all around -- kids must really enjoy the experience. Yes that's another part of that is in Oregon we've made such a big commitment to protecting our farms farms are big part of our economy. Come our laws to help to protect that land for farming but it's. It's really important for people to see those farms for them to make that connection about how. And those things go together and if we don't protect us farms they're not going to exist in the future our food would have to count for much further away. And so. It's another. Important part to our. Mission is just getting people out to see these farms and recognizing that you know -- that can feed 500 -- on families exist just a few miles away from where they live in the city. That's really great at it for kids it must be such. Fun experience to come from the city and immediately you're on a farm and that's really exciting to they stay out there what's experience like for a kid what what we threw. And there are can't do that they're -- a few days a week. Yes so for summer camps they're there for five days Monday through Friday. And you're there all day so depending on the -- running in the partnerships. Typically in 9330 day. And to each days they experience a different aspect of the farm. And a different really different -- topic altogether so. Generally speaking Mondays we explore and forests and food web and the connection. To farms to with a greater environments so ecological connections to Italy and around the farm. And then we moved in to -- to -- were they explore the life cycle plant. They get a chance to plant themselves and harvesting so they see both sides and that experience in X and get their hands in the dirt that's the big. Peace with that. Person of the curriculum. And then the next day we journey into plant parts and make it out I'm too. So the island organic farming harvests from the larger firm answers about eighteen acres up there and make attacked. Walk round and see now how they year experience in the growth lunch cart and which isn't that a -- 175 foot. Plot is connected to the speaker farm. And then. The next eight days journey into soils and compost and explore. That really a farmer is growing healthy soil and the result is. Healthy produce and so the goal is to keep. Soil very healthy and kids often come and they don't understand that. So it's really great for them to see some healthier soil on the country which we have talent -- the island and down. And then Friday we culminate that cam twist. Pollination and colony -- since they explore the life of and the importance of Holland manners. -- -- but that's the whole thing -- full package and then they got home and I need to learn anything else yeah completely brilliant -- -- important. Do any of them expresses the idea of wanting to become farmer in the future in their lives. Absolutely -- I ask that and I two and three quarters of the field trips fit in the closing circle. You know throughout the day whether it and just walking with a kid too. The next station or am you know just having a conversation in whenever. Closing circles. And usually there's at least one kid that says they're really interest in gardening are really interested in becoming a car. Do you volunteer opportunities with their organization so we -- center. If people want to voluntarily do that. Yes so our primary educators are volunteers. And so we see if there intercity to contact me if -- I run the volunteer program and we have one seasonal educator whose very part time in the rest of our programs are. -- I volunteers who we train them every fallen every spring. And they and they join us for about a ten week session. And it's teach Tuesday through Friday. So volunteers are essential to our program. He didn't live I'm assuming there's a website content -- -- -- -- -- it's time for the website www. So the -- center. Talk pork Paul -- and that's there's a volunteer link fair and it's. There's application simple process and and they can contact me and I'll bring him on board. I don't -- you get involved in this animals are the object of the moment is he out well I had worked for a number of different environmental. Organizations. And and you know always enjoyed that work and it wasn't until my kids were in school MP PS that. And they were at sunny Sandburg middle school which meant that they got to be outside a lot. And that's I -- more involved in now. Schools I just. Began to learn that that was kind of a unique experience for. Kids come in Portland which seemed like a really strange disconnect for -- mean because people value outdoor. Activity so much around here but we're not. Making it a priority for our kids in their schools and partly that's an issue of funding and time and so wants so I don't. -- the school torrent but. It just -- interest in how we could provide more of these opportunities to all kinds of kids. Across the city and so when this job came open and a friend told me about it it seems like a really great fit. And so I've been here for just my six here the great. So how much you have to get involved in surveillance enter. -- How long story I'm -- I'm. I'll do my best make -- certain sweetness. Hi hey you know my inspiration started when Ankara on fourteen acres of land myself and Adam. -- unique site and I think ultimately. Growing up and you know peninsula with an island school that was a property I explored when I was young led me to justice. Intuitive draw to an island to -- -- environments I spent a lot of my childhood. Exploring an island two and two learning about the ecology of the -- not connecting him. But to get to my -- when I was young I had to get into it at canoe or rowboat and brought there and I think that's where the seed was planted. Her mean and that it surveillance center between. That time and now all I -- I've done a variety of things from. And terminal education at various parks up in Seattle down here Portland's. I've worked in the nationalist position and several different organizations. I have. Supervised. Several. Education programs specifically at UW botanic gardens for five years I ran the education pre K through. I don't program out there and -- that was also. Natural area and Seattle park. I think that's around the clock -- the -- I -- an inland island again. Let's release the silent as a bridge and -- have to -- knew exactly. -- stated earlier time. That bring you bring to tell us if it's tennis so love. On the far more kids pick what they growing. Where they see is -- all kinds of -- couples and fruit and flowers and plants and. Yeah it's and it's an eighteen acre vegetable farms those. Just to take a step back I just want to tell you a little bit about this laid out there and numb because it's a kind of be unique situation so. Metro -- how old territorial park which is a 120 acre natural area. And then they at least eighteen acres of that land tooth so the -- organics farm which is a private business sense so. On those eighteen acres they broke -- forty different crops. Vegetable crops come and hey. Send out five to 600 boxes of vegetables each week to families around the region. And then also sell to about 25 or thirty restaurants. And so there's a lot of variety on the farm. And then we have. I really unique relationship with those two organizations as a public private partnership that really exist just to. Benefit kids in this community so they allow ST is the property at no cost to our nonprofit organization for the education of children. So we have pretty much free reign of this huge and diverse farm and also the natural area that surrounds that. I can find out about his. It's not obviously -- in the classroom right so most kids come to us through their schools so the teachers. Sign up for field trips so the bulk of the kids about 17100 kids this year. We'll come out in the spring and a fall with their classes. And a lot of those are Portland students are Bieber -- or aren't they could be private school or home school students. An important part of our mission is to make sure that all kids can have this opportunity and so we raise a lot of -- see each year or so bats. More than half of our programs going scholarships. Two kids who attempt title one schools in the region so those are some of our highest poverty schools in the schools that are less likely to have cons for field trips. How do you raise funds for the scholarships -- him every day. -- -- He's -- -- around so we do we have some grants that support these scholarship trips from foundations. -- businesses that support us through sponsorships and other. Donations. We do a lot we do some fundraising events and we house some fun. Events coming up this summer that I'd be happy to tell you know a little bit. -- and sleep involves a -- it doesn't. Are finding out if this man so early and and we haven't. Bunch of committed donors that -- support the program with their donations and it's and it costs about fifteen dollars to bring a child out for a day on the farms that's a pretty reasonable. Costs and a lot of people in -- on feel that's an important experience for a kid. In this area to have. Absolutely. So in -- the learned in its teeth so listen up that was yet. So the barn dance this is our sixth annual barn -- July 26 and that's our main fundraiser of the year. It's in the evening from 430 day eight. It's a really fun advance for families or for people without kids so it includes. Two hours of the farm hands including kids activities kids -- hours. We have a great barbecue prepared by chef -- Dion. We have a silent auction because remember it's a fund -- earned him. And men and the last hour of the event includes a square dance with the collar and we have live music in the evening as well so. It's a lot of fun it's a beautiful location you know how nice it is to be out on Sylvia -- on the fifteenth and evening in the summer. In the in the July 1 part of August it's usually guaranteed some pretty good weather almost that well. Patience saying we're like yeah yeah yeah it is a nice leather every. So far. In the -- give screen dancing lessons they did yes there's that collar always walks people through I just -- don't -- We're too busy working but it around the collar always helps people through it so that packets tempered state everybody even if you haven't done before. How do we get to a stimulant. -- only I'm glad you asked to confront them on our website at www. -- violence -- -- -- work. Excellent who executes -- throughout the year -- those that give Google. Yes so we don't gradient that's cents each year because they want to engage. Family is and other people. We have a family cooking camp later this summer and you can find information about that -- web site as well. This a few weeks ago we -- pollination celebration. On Saturday. Morning US national pollen -- weakens so. We brought kids out kids and families out to learn about pollination. We've partnered with metro for atmosphere to society as well -- And then we'd also do some events in town. For people to come and you know months for some people feels like a long way to go out so the island and so. We usually do a couple of -- in the spring and the fall. In the -- eco trust him in the spring -- art institute of per months culinary. School town where people can come and eat great food and learn about our programs. What is the soil and everything about surveillance a spectacular. News. It's another great question I feel like there's a lot of current bloody answers to that. Well. Really the island was developed over thousands of years from the -- deal. Deposits from the surrounding. Valley the highlands and everything and so the island slowly formed over time and yeah it has been flooded. On several occasions and her and so that's a whale has so many of breach naturally rich -- minerals and nutrients built right in. And so it's already healthy soil that farmers are working with to maintain. It's health overtime. When you look when you walk parents -- down under an -- farm and you look at their freshly -- soil it's like and it's looking like looking at. -- waste chocolate cake and you're just like you just wanna eat it it was so how do you look at and T. We realize that the farmers there are doing an excellent job and preserving the land them. And then island itself it's just I mean it's an island of oak woodlands meadows. Handers late in the middle the islanders' only is different and wonderful. -- habitats and so I would say it's unique. Two of the entire region is you have all those habitat someone islands. That'll trigger instability stuff kids don't learn in the classroom and so it's great for them to be able to come mountain and -- with knowledge. We do a fun little. Exercise each day doing kids come out on -- kinds on the school less when they first -- and she says what kind of things do you think you're gonna see growing out here today. And and you know they throw out all kinds of things including. Things like bananas and orange has and and so it's it's one way. But since it's one way that illustrates just how the disconnect between. Kids and food these days and so by the end of the day when we come back around to this question and we talk about. You know what are the kind of things that really grow around here they have a pretty good and understanding because they've had an opportunity to walk around this farm with all their different. Crops and so they'll leave without a bit of an understanding that when they see. Ahead of let us or ahead of K ill at the supermarket that that's what kind of thing that could have grown around here to carrots and broccoli. But spent the banana. Probably didn't. Yeah and then an understanding of the native plants and to reach into so they're exposed to. The naturally college -- they're so they see organ trade and -- some of the native trees and so they walk away understanding happen. A relief to place that they come from the place after living better. Then during camp. -- so they give them a luxury it's clear they're having fresh vegetables fruit from the farm yeah. We only harvest it straight from the -- once garden every day and I don't know that we gave much background and Brooklyn starred in but it's at planted by all. The participants in the field trip I saw in the spring. How 175 foot plot is ready to play -- and kids come on the first field trips and they start planting seeds. Or start sets we sometimes get from Savannah mechanics after they've gone through fields and -- to -- crops. And then it slowly over time those crops grow in the kids that visits. In a few weeks get to harvest what was just planted by other Portland kids earlier and this season and so it's it's really great full circle experience in this connection. To each other. Her food. -- answer every day camp -- some harvesting and preparing a food and then up every Wednesday during the camp weeks were joined by chefs from new seasons markets -- -- come out and do more intensive cooking project with the kids so now harvests from the firm also but they'll make something that's a little bit more involved. And so that is always a favorite date for kids. And I just want to mention that. A lot of our camps are full but we still have room in our final week of -- so fast sound -- appealing to anyone you -- -- information again on our website which is so be violence centered on court. He gets turned their noses up -- The traditional things like broccoli and they -- really do some do because -- do they get a new appreciation for. But I think he -- by -- the end of the day most kids are -- leading. Turned on to. Something you know. Tasting just still exploring her T expect a little bit and maybe being surprised that they liked spicy nests of the mustard plant horror. You know the sweetness of a pepper when they came in thinking they only like spicy peppers -- so it's really not only exposure to -- totally new foods but exploring. They're palate as well which is fun. And it's just a very different experience from when you're picking up something yourself and helping and being able to taste it. Kids are almost always going to want to track it so it's very different from serving them. Charge at the dinner table if they can pick deterred and tasted and if they don't like it they consider now. In most cases they are going to like -- sit down. And in fact in most cases are gonna want to -- some into their pockets to bring home that the for their families because they get really excited about it. And the Celtics -- must be nice to just show them. How to cook it and it in a different way maybe hold up a whole new experience. Yeah it's really cool when they come for campus and now this shaft comes midweek the kids a party then. Tending to the -- once -- harvesting from in making fresh salads. And now all there in this empowering role to give the new seasons -- a little tour of the garden and can't point out what. They should harvest and how I. Full circle. And then. They go back in May prepare together and then serve it -- -- calling a last summer and -- -- because the by B how stuff the start by the house is on site where we have campaign. So we opened up with Kathy ideally preserve each other at different salads and sound the food. Could see in collaboration with the seasons stuff. That's fantastic so in just a little remaining time we have here let's remind everybody in about the warned against women wearing coveted tickets. Yeah so the finance is July 26. From 430 to eight. It's a really fun event for family is or for people without kids there's a variety of different seating. Arrangements and you confined to all of that to information and information -- tickets on our web site. Asked Sylvia and senator dot org. And it's a Saturday night it's a Saturday perfect the perfect time -- and yes absolutely -- game and I thought that that. Clinical -- and so on a hard time thank you so much -- limit the scope today. Thank you get a chance thanking him. Yeah -- scopus and Entercom communications public affairs program my name's Gary and if you have a nonprofit or public affairs organization that you'd like let others know about. You can email me at metro Scopes @entercom.com. Remember intercom starts with a B four you can go directly to the station's website click on the community link and submit your information there. Also we like to hear this program again you can visit our podcast page at microscope PDX dot com. Thanks for listening to microscope and enjoy your weekend.