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JDRF 8.10.14

Aug 5, 2014|

An interview with Judy Summers, Executive Director with JDRF about type 1 diabetes, research to find a cure, and fund raising efforts locally.

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Automatically Generated Transcript (may not be 100% accurate)

You're listening to -- got a series of interviews of people of interest in northwest Oregon and southwest Washington. My name's Gary blossomed and today a microscope. We're going to be talking about diabetes and specifically type one diabetes in the Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation -- JD RM. JD RF has a plan and the plan is a world without type one diabetes. And today a microscope and like to welcome Judy Summers sees the executive director with -- JD RS by duty. Hyperion -- here today -- what what we're gets started today by letting everybody know what JD RF is what does that stand for -- Let me tell you that JE RS is the Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation it was -- -- in 1970 back parents of children with type one diabetes. Over the years we have recognized that there are a number of adults living with type one diabetes in fact 85%. Of the population of type one diabetics are adults. The children have grown up. And now 50% of the new diagnoses are children in 50% or adults so we stop spilling juvenile cannot. Because we want to be the now known. Because we wanted to -- whose organization. That have plans to cure for type one diabetes so it's just called GDR FJ area yes little similarly sources and I. -- the yeah. It's does acronyms that fiery end of the health care industry and so. We've been using that for 23 years now -- and people are starting to pick up current south. So by giving us some numbers what sort of people are being Guidant diagnosed as children and as adults -- absolutely and what's what what's the population. Well the population. The Americans with all types of diabetes type one in tattoos 26 million. We see that the number of people diagnosed each year with type one diabetes is 30000. And so that is a mixture of children and adults and that the latest statistics I invested 50% are children. And 50% of our adults of the news. Newly diagnosed people with -- one. And -- bit -- the focus of a lot of the news is about type two diabetes but. GDR us focuses mostly -- one is that correct. Absolutely tough one is an autoimmune diseases for which there is no cure. Many times and not always people with tattoos can change their -- lose weight. And get there have blood sugar levels under control whereas those with -- one require insulin to lift. And so our goal is to find a cure for type one diabetes in in the meantime. Find ways to better manage type one diabetes because the complications are the problems. With people with the highs and -- blood sugar. How close are we to a cure. Currently. 568. Million dollars an active Taft -- diabetes research worldwide. We fund more diabetes research than any of the organization in the world to your -- And so. In 2013. Are -- was a 106 million dollars to research. And so we're really proud of that the money that we raise in Oregon we know it was coming back to fund research an -- Since 20014. Point eight million dollars in research projects have been funded in the state of Oregon and south of Washington. So. Our chapter is that organ southwest Washington chapter so we're proud to say that the money that -- racing here is coming back to fund research projects in there is some incredible research being done here. And there's a lot of lobbying done -- -- -- issue it is being -- LH -- some instant it legacy. The veteran's hospital a number of different facilities and we had a number of researchers over the years from a variety of different research institutions can you tell us about some of them projects that are coming out of here. Artificial pancreas project is a very exciting projects that have research is being end here in the Portland area. And I believe it's one of the seven locations around the United States. It's. Where. A system would it take glucose takes testing -- new level. In. The glucose monitor would talk to insulin -- And -- automated Smith delivery of insulin in additional hormones. And so for those living with type one diabetes it means not giving yourself a shot every day it means one device that she monitor rather than two devices so. A lot of exciting research is going on in the year. There's had a research and being down here. About by the sales today it is a lot of it's over my head but that is going on here. In the end we have a steady sustained and I researcher about diabetes and kidney disease and how those two -- relate. So. It's very exciting exciting -- being done right -- own backyard absolutely. So -- a lot of this stuff through a lot of this research forging your house -- funded. JE RF. Heads a the interview panel of scientists and peer reviewers and anyone can submit you grant that. He's doing work in the field of diabetes two are grant. Process. In the end there's just a specific selection process which is way over my head as well I'm sure. And your dad danced in the most promising research projects are chosen. To make a difference. And then live as our listeners can also help them by donating money and being involved in the things you do throughout the year. Absolutely. And -- our chapter. Is based in Portland we serve that whole side of Oregon and south as Washington. We have I want to cure diabetes which is it 628 this year at oaks park we'll have a -- for -- -- as a people clear. We raise money in that manner we have a walk in the spring Indians in central organ. The central organ -- with this will be our third year. We have a black time gala in the spring each year to raise money. And then there's a national grad program which is a destination right we're cyclists can raise money in go to these great destinations and -- with the addition to raising money for. -- -- -- So the walk is coming up and to -- dislike him a couple of months sixteen to 28 two months right away how can we start raising money if we want to get involved. To participate in the launched your diabetes in Portland you can go to -- did he did it dot walk dot. In register is an individual walker is it our as a team. Are you can call our office at about 036431. And then back in someone walking through the steps have had to register for the walk. The -- it's it's it's a pretty easy walking down before you started oaks park intended to stroll around the neighborhood is low -- -- is very family friendly we hit children stroller -- people in wheelchairs and so it's you know family friendly. We say did it today for the people with -- one to silver mean together and they celebrate the fundraising that's been denser at the your -- area and that they had -- to the walk and and we have a lot of things going on the day so it's and really really fun AT&T and -- money comes back to research rate here in our area yes it does that's what that's what we're really proud -- that research projects are being offended pageant you're -- -- It's also a little bit about -- outreach services. We have a great outreach program we have one of the things that is one of my favorites is colored bag of hope and it's for our children that are newly diagnosed with type one in it's a backpack with -- the -- And -- this is a -- when diabetic mayor and his family friendly and child friendly educational material in it. And I talked to teenagers and grown ups that have gotten a bag of -- years ago and they still have -- the -- and remember that he was a good friend to them and they needed -- We have an adult tough -- supper club for adults with type one. We recognize that with the growing and awareness of the population of adults with type one we need to connect people. And so there's is a social network for dinner -- so -- that are adults. The inverse can to end. It's interesting because -- with it's I just twenty to seventy that it attendance at different combination every month and we found that some of the people -- been living with diabetes the longest they've never talked to another person topped one. Because when they were diagnosed back in the -- that people in talk about things like that publicly. And so it's interesting they they shared their successes about managing their blood sugar levels and their news devices and so. It's a really did. Network. We also have a young leadership council that asset to twenty somethings that meet once a month and as a network. We have a -- children's art group that once a month meets. Mitt pottery -- the owner is tough -- himself in a host says in the kids canyon and do our projects is siblings can their appearance can. And I honestly think the parents enjoy as much as the kids stayed because they get to talk to each other about what's gone on with their children and how they're dealing with their deceased. With a -- one. So. We also have literature that we see in day out we hit two -- we had two kids that -- can take into school to help educate. Educators a -- -- diabetes and they can take this took it to school in the hands. Information to share with the educators and administrators of doubt their child living with type one diabetes it's very helpful. We have a mentor group where we have a group of parents that have gone through training and if someone -- newly diagnosed or has been diagnosed. Are their child is in the need a shoulder to lean on or someone to talk to -- its experience will mix them up with a mentor. I would imagine that well know from personal experience that being diagnosed as a type one -- an -- and if you have a child that's been diagnosed as a type one diabetic. You feel really alone you don't know your whole world has changed in ten. JD RF gives you the way to speak to other people about what's going on in your life and have played you say is sort of intimated to talk to. In the distract her life has changed so what's going on. Oh yeah that's what I hear because those with -- one. Type one diabetes never -- why you can't ever take a break would have when daddy she had to watch everybody Fiji take. All day long. Parents tell me that they don't sleep that not because they're worried that their child is gonna go into alone. It's great to have the network of people to connect with is tested mini adults this is needed him. Many of the parents. Tell me they don't sleep that -- because they worry that their child we'll have that severe load in the night. But the news medical devices that have been created the insulin pumps and meters. Those kinds of things have alarms on them. And so it's really made managing the disease. Much better and that is the -- The the you don't hear of people. Losing the battle with topped one. It's the complications from not managing blood sugar levels that are the hardest -- cause heart attacks stroke. And their complications and so. The kidneys can be affected but if a -- and it can get a level. Blood sugar level that stable and manage it well. That a -- says complications and so that's that's why the research that we're doing now for medical devices an insulin. Is as important as finding a cure because until we have that -- cure we can help people live that their quality of life. And there are so many new devices out there that they're really exciting in and help people manage their health so much better. Absolutely absolutely -- series -- in the end there's more coming in every day. That's just so key is that is the management is is in any chronic disease knowing your body in knowing how to take care yourself -- you know has to start the year until this secure there must -- weight management absolutely. Excellent so did Europe as well known and respected for its advocacy efforts can you tell -- little bit about the yes. We -- -- felons that comes from the government after research spending and it's a very critical part research funding for diabetes. And there is a special diabetes program that congress approves every two years. And being -- RF matches. That money. But in order to get to prove it has to go to the legislative process and so engineer and has its own advocacy group. With volunteers that stay in touch with -- elected officials. Go on Capitol Hill. And it's a very active and important network. And so it's key to get this renewed every year because once researches starting. If the money doesn't come it stops in its gotta keep going so. -- advocacy is very very important time to us and letting those elected officials know all the good work that's being -- in him that funding is critical. And that it has to keep doing absolutely yes the -- -- to get involved as a volunteer what sort of volunteer opportunities there. People can volunteer to be part of an idea that we always need help in the office. And what volunteers schedule of volunteers. Outreach volunteers. We've always got a place for someone wants to help us in and we appreciate that we were allowed volunteers junior for standing by volunteers. And so that we can put more money to research we -- very lean. Through out our chapters in for instance in our -- covers organist at this Washington we only have three full time paid employees. And many other nonprofits are -- -- have my work. But that is just because we have such strong and dedicated volunteers that help us accomplish what we need to -- we can do with our volunteers they -- the heart and soul of organization. He's a -- earth was started by volunteers -- a little history of -- era where tenure was started in 1970 in -- in New York area there were two families that got together that started around kitchen table on told. And it's grown from near zero for 200 chapters Nam and where also international in another and a number of foreign countries. And so. It's that it's that passion. That keeps organizations alarms and doing great things. There are a number of areas in research. That -- Europe's discovering and fending. And artificial pancreas which I mentioned earlier. And they're looking it therapies to deal with complications. To -- in reverse complications that result. From the in -- just type one diabetes. In -- cancellation is one of the most exciting new research projects. When people have type one diabetes it means at their beta cells are not functioning. The body fat -- any intrusion obviously in so. Transplanting beta cells on their own. This aid in the production of insulin. It's not possible. So researchers -- has come up with a process. To encapsulate. In close -- to say also and they are implanted in the body. They can continue to grow in duplicate. So this is is. We knew it should be in human trial soon -- we're very excited about it because if people can replace the latest self function. That helps eliminate the need for taking insulin every. And so that's that's a new a new breakthrough that we're most excited about. So the beta cells live in the pancreas and they are attacked by year. And the immune system friends of these beta cells would be kind of resistant to the immune to. Hey there encapsulated and protected so that they can do their job and again this is science it's a little bit over my -- government deficit but. The basically tells me that. It they're going to be trying it in humans so. That's very exciting that is exciting. How about the glucose responsive insulin. That is listening to -- then is very exciting that's where a person we take a single dose of insulin H today. And it would regulate itself via the body whenever the body need insulin it would provided and then turn off when it's not and so that is something that's actually an active research now as well. So any thing. You know I had I had so many friends that have tapped Warren and -- AG will know. Before you each you have to stop and check your blood sugar level and then you had to consider what you're eating not only further. Sugar in it that for the carbohydrates in it and so it's never a break from monitoring constantly and having something that she can do to treat this that gives she's. A better quality of life that is incredible hidden and we're really excited about the yet. Is there any resource to show him about prevention is there a way to prevent getting took on -- You know. There are studies now that are being again in family members to see if there is that genetic marker that someone not have a propensity to develop type one diabetes. That. What we're hoping to find is if we do fan someone is possibly going to develop -- one or has that propensity. For them marker. What can they be to keep from going full board. And so there is research being done in that area as well so prevent is the first an area. And preventing someone from and developing full blown -- diabetes. Treat hacking you manage it better hacking he treated better. The insulin devices. And then ultimately the cure is what we're really after is how can we reverse type one diabetes in some. Is take one more prevalent in the United States or is it's a total worldwide. Well it's a challenge to. Predict that are to report that because. Most of the places do not -- daddy's registries. And doctors cannot give out that information is a simple laws. But what I am told is there are areas that have a higher level and higher incidence of type one diabetes. We don't know if that's environmental triggers or our diet or what ever they ideas but. It still goes back to being an autoimmune disease. Debt is not. You know you can't just stop eating something in get rid of top foreign. So there is research being and to figure out you know what triggers the yes and there's a lot of theories on this and that times of year when people are diagnosed you know stressful times can trigger that in the body. The immune system to fail. So it's a very interesting question and it's something we don't have the total answer to day. It's being looked into it. That's right your listener who once again the difference between we're talking mostly about type one type is. What's the difference between type one diabetes and type two diabetes type -- seems to be the one that's in the news the most and and probably people are more familiar with -- two. Yes we'll -- one. Is when the body's immune system destroys the sales that release insulin which eventually there's no insulin production from the body. Without insulin the body sales can't absorb sugar or glucose. Which they need to produce energy. So that is tapped Warren now tied to. Is mostly diagnosed in adults. Although there's a growing number of children. Being diagnosed with this -- obesity in in. Either. -- Related causes. But. Intact to the body can't use insulin the correct way in -- call insulin resistance. And so as -- -- tapped to daddy's progresses. The pancreas can make less and less insulin in this is called insulin deficiency. So. Basically there is some insulin production in people with -- too no insulin production with -- one and people with -- one must take insulin to Sarah. That we need we need from an alternate source absolutely can and -- we're gonna type one diabetic or use an insulin pump right and its it's fantastic. That is currently keeps me alive. Now why it'd be interesting you know. We hear so amazing numbers from the political habitat when daddy's for a long time how many times they stick their fingers do blood test. How many times have they given himself shots. -- with the native masses of the monitors there's. There's a sat on your body where you attention transmitted to your body in it automatically. Reach your blood sugar levels so you don't have to keep sticking. Multiple times a day. Then again with insulin pump. It administers insulin in and the need for shots is not here so. You know makes a lot easier if you're you're needle -- who pump is the way to go home crowd the -- Not only -- has to deal with providing your -- insulin because it's not making an insulin. You had to do -- -- -- -- -- is when your body has too much insulin and so it constantly is a balance every hour of every day. That's definitely a delicate balance he can lead to -- And he can be too low crime and can neither one is good. It's it's a true test of of some skills to -- to balance her life and if you have a child with type one the parent is responsible for that because the kid and Billy doesn't know how to do that so that can be a real challenge for adults. Absolutely and then the children grow and is that grows their -- changes kick in that changes everything. You know and and so it's a constant. Monitoring process and you know I hear that did teenagers have daddy started out. Where -- they just get really charted dealing with and they don't monitors closely associated so that's a challenge for the parent. It's one -- our listeners can get involved as being part of the walk to cure diabetes give us the dates again for the walk to cure maybe it's Sunday September Victoria -- -- oaks park. And you can register and walk dot GD RF dot org mr. team renewed individually absolutely. Raise some funds and those funds come right back to the Syria they do and if you wanna go online if she can't -- to the -- that day you can contribute online through that same -- sat. And I think some stores around town and seem a little. The little shoe with a you can sign -- the -- sneakers many of the places do that we're right now. -- that Walgreens had just get a pinch hit campaign for us. Fred Meyer is -- a year long campaign where you can -- your Fred -- rewards hard to. -- area and we get donations from prisoners. Doors in that -- that's very nice yeah and always volunteer opportunities available NG zero dot org absolutely. Judy Summers the executive director with JD RF thank you for being limit the scope to the. It's a pleasure to be here Geary -- a good friend of -- is active with our chapter and so it's like -- -- different point. Well thank -- Metals gold was an Entercom communications public affairs program. My name's Gary and if you have a nonprofit or public affairs organization that you'd like let others know about you can email me at microscope @entercom.com. Remember Fincher can't start -- Or you can go directly to the station's website click on the community linked in some major information there. Also we like to -- this program again you can visit our podcast page at microscope PDX dot com. Thanks for listening to microscope and enjoy your weekend. Am predominate as a husband and then either. -- -- Even in kind. Music now Chris is facing a very different story. He's revealing basically did doctors say if you don't get a kidney transplant. If you don't you dialysis. You are going to die. Fortunately Crist received a second chance at life made possible by an organ donor you know years well being changes. From last couple. Do hope. Do there's guys ahead more than 100 million people in America are registered organ eye and tissue donor. Every agent it's. Relief it's the right thing to do. My leaving behind -- gift of life learn more and sign up as an organ I NTC donors go to -- you don't have -- how. This is from the US to -- How resources and services administration. America's national forests and wilderness areas are -- I'm sure. Yeah the CD that's where we can relax. Our forests are being devastated. Five years and now it's up to posture and. We are really foundation ask for your help. And future generations. Visit our every -- -- season.